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12 Acupressure Points For Brain Fog You Can Use When You Need To Refresh Your Mind

Acupressure is a practice similar to acupuncture, both practices stemming from Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Unlike acupuncture, which requires small needles to target pressure points on the body, acupressure is a practice utilizing the fingers and hands to stimulate acupressure points. All pressure points are located along meridians in the body which allow energy, or “qi” according to TCM, to travel. 

Pressure points and acupressure can help with thousands of ailments from headaches to foot pain to TMJ to skin diseases. In this article, we are exploring the top acupressure points for brain fog and acupressure points for brain power. That’s right – there are acupressure points for blood circulation in the brain that will help with fog and fatigue. Read on to see how!

Does acupuncture help with brain fog?

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Yes! Acupuncture, and acupressure, will allow for blood movement in the body. Targeting the right points will get the blood moving in and around the brain, helping with fog.

How does acupuncture affect the brain?

As mentioned, acupuncture will stimulate blood and energy flow. This flow will nourish and activate the brain, allowing you to be sharp and get rid of any fogginess.

How many acupuncture sessions do you need to see results with brain fog?

Results will vary from person to person, but studies have shown an average of 2-6 sessions a week will result in progress. This will be different for every person, so do what feels right for you while monitoring your progress.

What foods should I avoid to help with brain fog?

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Any foods high in sugar and refined carbohydrates will worsen brain fog. Do your best to avoid sugary drinks and processed foods. Alcohol and other impairing substances will also have an extremely negative effect on the functionality of the brain. As for foods you should eat, make sure you’re consuming enough vitamin B-12, as it promotes healthy brain function. 

The 12 Acupressure Points For Brain Fog

Acupoint: GV-20 (Other Names: The Governing Vessel-20/Bai Hui/Hundred Convergence)

First on our list of acupressure points for brain fog is GV-20. Along the “Governing Vessel”, the GV 20 acupuncture point can help move energy and clear brain fog. It can help with many head problems, including insomnia, vertigo, dizziness, and even a coma. This acupoint is located on the centerline at the very top of the head. Place firm pressure, but be careful as this acupoint can be sensitive for many people. You can read more about this acupoint and how it is one of the best acupressure points for the bladder

Si Shen Cong (4 extraordinary points on top of the head)

The Si Shen Cong (or “four spirit alert”) makes up four points on the top of the head. Like GV-20, this set of vertices can help with many ailments of the head by calming the Shen, including headaches, dizziness, and vertigo. The four points are located around the GV20 acupuncture point, seen above in the diagram. The four points are all about one cun from GV-20 in radial positions: one forward (towards the face), one backward, one directly to the right, and one directly to the left.

Acupoint: EM-2 (Other Names: /Yin Tang/Hall of Impression)

Acupoint: EM-2 (Other Names: /Yin Tang/Hall of Impression)

Though this point is not a part of a specific meridian, Em2 provides great benefits throughout the body. Em2 is located on the traditional “third eye” placement of the body – right in between the eyebrows and just above where the nose begins. This point will greatly stimulate energy and blood flow, resulting in the alleviation of brain fog symptoms. We’ve written another blog about the third eye acupressure point, so you can learn more about its benefits.

Acupoint: GB-13 (Other Names: Gallbladder-13/Ben Shen/Root of the Spirit)

Located on the gall bladder meridian, Gb-13 is yet another point located on the head and is one of the great acupressure points to achieve mental clarity. Like the others, this acupoint helps with headaches, dizziness, and even epilepsy. This point is located just behind the hairline and towards the outside of the head. Find the center of your eyebrow, move your finger straight up towards (and just past) your hairline, and you have found this acupoint. You can also find it 3 cun from either side of GV-24. 

Acupoint: GV-24 (Other Names: The Governing Vessel-24/Shen Ting/Spirit Courtyard)

Like One Hundred Meetings, the Spirit Courtyard point is located along the Governing Vessel. Engaging this acupressure point can open up the nose and allow for energy flow in your head, thus reducing fatigue, increasing energy, and helping greatly with brain fog symptoms. Other benefits observed include alleviation from vertigo, headache, and insomnia. This acupoint is also one of the key acupressure points for hair growth. GV-24 is located in the center of the body, right at the hairline, seen above.

Acupoint: GB-20 (Other Names: Gallbladder-20/Feng Chi/Wind Pool)

Another point on the gallbladder meridian, Gb-20, serves to clear the head, eyes, nose, and throat. This point lies along the crossing of the gallbladder meridian and the Yang Wei Vessel, allowing for intense energy and blood flow. The Wind Pool is also one of the great acupressure points for neck pain and acupressure points for the thyroid. Gb-20 is located on either side of the neck, where the hairline starts at the neck. The points are about halfway between the spine and ear.

Acupoint: EM-35 (Other Names: Zhong Quan)

Another point not located along a conventional meridian, Em35, is located on the wrist. According to Wikipedia, this acupoint is “On the dorsal crease of the wrist, in the depression on the radial side of the tendon of the common extensor muscle of the fingers”. Engage this point with firm pressure to experience the energy flow and relief from a foggy and tired brain.

Acupoint: HT-7 (Other Names: Heart-7/Shen Men/Spirit Gate)

The Spirit Gate acupoint, located along the heart meridian, is next on our list of acupressure points for brain fog. Stimulating the Spirit Gate will help with insomnia, amnesia, heart issues (such as palpitations and chest pain), and much more. Ht-7 is another one of the key acupressure points for the thyroid, like Gb-20. Located on the wrist, this acupoint is easy to find and engage yourself. Find the crease of your wrist on the underside, then move your finger inwards (towards the pinky). Stop before the edge of the wrist, and you have found this acupoint.

Acupoint: PC-6 (Other Names: Pericardium-6/Nei Guan/Inner Pass)

Acupoint: PC-6 (Other Names: Pericardium-6/Nei Guan/Inner Pass)

The Inner Pass acupressure point is located on the pericardium meridian and can help the body in a variety of ways. Pc-6 will open up the chest, help regulate the stomach and heart, and regulate energy flow throughout the entire body. Apart from clearing head fog, this acupoint can help with other ailments around the head, such as hiccups, vomiting, asthma, and even depression. The Inner Pass is so versatile that it’s even one of the pain acupressure points for gas and bloating. This point is located in the center of your forearm, about three fingers from your wrist. This point is located in between the two tendons that run down your forearm.

Acupoint: PC-8 (Other Names: Pericardium-8/Lao Gong/Palace of Toil)
Lao Gong

The Palace of Toil is located on the pericardium meridian, just like the Inner Pass acupoint. This acupoint does an incredible job of clearing heat from the heart, helping with ailments such as cardiac pain, vomiting, mouth pain, and a foggy head. People who regularly engaged this acupoint have even noticed a more clear complexion. If you (or someone you live with) suffers from snoring, this acupoint is key among the acupressure points for snoring. Pc-8 is very easy to engage, being right in the center of the palm. 

Acupoint: SP-6 (Other Names: Spleen-6/San Yin Jiao/Three Yin Intersection)

Acupoint: SP-6 (Other Names: Spleen-6/San Yin Jiao/Three Yin Intersection)
Acupoint: SP-6 (Other Names: Spleen-6/San Yin Jiao/Three Yin Intersection)

The Three Yin Intersection is an extremely versatile and beneficial acupressure point. Aside from helping to clear fog from the brain, this point can help with menstruation, infertility, genital pain, insomnia, skin diseases, and so much more. Since this point is on the leg, it also made our list of acupressure points for blood circulation in the legs. Sp-6 is easy to engage – find the knobby ankle bone on the inside of your leg, then move your fingers up about 4 cuns.

Acupoint: Liv-3 (Other Names: Liver-3/Tai Chong/Supreme Rush)

Acupoint: Liv-3 (Other Names: Liver-3/Tai Chong/Supreme Rush)

Located on the liver meridian, Supreme Rush is the final acupoint on our list of acupressure points for brain fog. Supreme Rush is a critical point for moving energy and blood throughout the body, resulting in benefits such as alleviation from menstrual cramps, depression, epilepsy, eye pain, headaches, and more. It’s also one of the great acupressure points for tinnitus. Find the spot in between your big and second toe, then move your finger back on your foot about 1.5 cun. Then you have found the Liv-3 acupoint.

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